The Honest Faith: Live and Let Die

I am notorious for not letting things go that easily. Especially when they have to do with the stupid things that I have done. It is like I have a little gremlin living inside my mind who enjoys replaying these moments over and over again. Even the seemingly innocuous ones that nobody actually cares about anymore, except me. Moments like when I accidentally called a student in my small group by the wrong gender for more than half an hour. It was back in 2010. I doubt that student still thinks about that or resents me for it, but I still feel bad about it. I think we as human beings have a tough time letting things go. Maybe it is fear of change, maybe it is our fear of death, maybe through an odd and twisted sense of nostalgia (and maybe a bit of hoarding), we need to hold on to every memory.

A few months ago I was talking to a priest about my then predicament. He said to me, “As Christians, we are meant to be a resurrection people. But the funny thing is, we have a very tough time with letting things die so that they may be resurrected.” Again this was a few months ago so I may be quoting wrong. But that stuck with me. It has been on my mind a lot recently especially as we are now in the Christian Holy Week and the Jewish Passover time. The imagery of life out of death isn’t just in the Judeo-Christian arena either. If you listen to creation stories from across the world there is this image of life out of death. There are even stories of mythical creatures that death does not bind them but make them better.

Greek mythology the Phoenix is reborn or regenerated from the ashes of its predecessor. In Hindu mythology, the Garuda, which is the mount of lord Vishnu, is also a bird of resurrection. The Slavic Firebird, the Iranian Simurgh, and even the Chinese Fenghuang are all resurrection birds. Even the Aztec had a story and mythos of a god creature that was a symbol for resurrection, it just so happens to be my “birth diety”, Quetzalcoatl. This isn’t to say that since we all have an idea of resurrection we should be fine with death. No, it’s to say that, as Semisonic put it, every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end.

So why then do we not want things to end? Are we afraid of the pain? There was a sermon point that I remember from when I was just starting in ministry. A pastor was preaching on Jesus healing a lame beggar. He focused on Jesus asking the man, “Do you want to be healed?”. He put it to the congregation. He said that so many of us prefer not to be healed because on some level we enjoy the pity, attention, and righteous anger that wounds afford us. That is something that has stuck with me for a long time. In fact, I think I’ve written about it before, but even I’m tired of me posting links to my former blog posts. Do we not want to let things die because we prefer the pain? Do we feel as though we deserve the pain?

Being a resurrection people means that we know that life comes from death. We know that when some other beginning ends we can look forward to a new beginning. I’ve had many such transitions personally in the past year. I’ve gone from being a man to being a father, a much better title in my opinion. I’ve gone from being a youth worker to being a writer with an insurance habit. I went from being a renter to a homeowner, which granted was not good timing, but I’m still enjoying it. This past year I’ve watched parts of me die.

I’ve watched dreams die. I’ve seen the death of legends. I’ve watched beautiful ideas go up in flames before they had a chance to live. I’ve had my fair share of death. I know that I’m not done with it either. Though I’m not afraid of death. I’m not afraid of the pain I know I will encounter because I am a resurrection person. I know that from every beginnings end, a new beginning is waiting for me. I know that death leads to life. Death is not the end. Instead, it is a chance for rebirth.

From all of my experiences, I have discovered that when something is reborn, most of the time it’s better than the original (unless you are counting movie reboots or tv show reboots, but I’m not.). We, all of us, no matter your religion or background, are a resurrection people. So when “if this ever changin’ world In which we live in Makes you give in and cry say live and let die”. We feel the pain, we endure, we move on. As I said last week, together we can make it through anything.

One of my favorite sayings is, “You can’t paint a masterpiece without using some dark colors.” One of the things that has always annoyed me about christians (small c on purpose) especially this time of year, is the glossing over the darkness leading up to Easter morning. Holy week is all about the darkness. We move from this rebellious celebration in the streets to one dark day after another. Leading up to the darkest of days that we call “Good”. We mourn a death every year, but we then celebrate new life a few days after. Death calls to life. I would even argue that the darkness the death makes you so much more appreciative of the light and life.

In all of this, I think we need to take a moment to embrace the darkness. We need to mourn the loss of what has passed but know that a new beginning is on the horizon. My wife said it best in one of our podcasts as a shout out to another podcast (synergy in action!) that the loss of our previous pregnancies made us appreciate our son all the more. Knowing the pain that we went through made the joy so much better. Maybe that is what it means to be a resurrection person. It means that we are called to enjoy all that comes our way: the life, the pain, the joy, the sorrow, whatever it may be because we know that death is a part of life. The bad makes the good so much brighter. Death calls to life.

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